Blogless: Blog of Design Less Better.

Posts tagged Privacy.

Four Ethics Links:
July 5, 2010

Four ethics links is a review of recent stories in applied ethics. This week: Business Ethics for Recent College Grads, Twitter and Corporate Ethics Agreements, The Ethics of Criticism, and Ethics in Chinese Science.

1. Workplace Ethics: The High Cost of Compromise

Kirk O. Hansen recently made some interesting observations about the ethical challenges that will face new college graduates. Facing the current, difficult economy, Hansen claims, will "make ethical decisions even tougher."

Because it has been difficult this year to land any job, new graduates will be less likely to resist, less likely to put their new position at risk in order to do the right thing. And that threatens to undermine the ethical character of this year's graduates at the outset of their careers.

John Constable: Detail from 'Seascape Study with Rain Cloud'
John Constable, Detail from Seascape Study with Rain Cloud (c.1824)
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PaulJul 5, 2010
 

Four Ethics Links: June 14, 2010

Four ethics links is a review of recent stories in applied ethics. This week: Privacy for Animals, Ethics for Extraterrestrials, iPhone Obsession, and Stolen DNA.

1. Do animals need privacy?

Brett Mills at the University of East Anglia suggests that the ethics of the media and privacy should be extended beyond humans to the animal world. He says it might be acceptable to film "public events" such as animals hunting - but questions more intrusive recording. For humans, he says, it is assumed that documentary makers would need consent to go into people's private lives, but no such boundary exists for wildlife filmmakers.

Albrecht Dürer: Young Hare
Albrecht Dürer, Young Hare
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PaulJun 14, 2010
 

Trick.ly

Trick.ly is a URL shortener with a twist. You can share a URL but hide it behind a question that only insiders can easily answer.

Sort of Private

Via Seth's Blog:

The internet is constantly, relentlessly public. Post something and it's there, for everyone, all the time.

Acar has come up with a clever idea, a small idea that makes things just a little protected. Trick.ly is a URL shortener with a twist. You can share a URL but hide it behind a question that only insiders can easily answer.

So, for example, you could tweet, "Here's the source for my world-class chili: http://trick.ly/2L5". Anyone can go there, but only people who can figure out the clue can discover the site you were pointing to.

It's not secure. It's sort of private. Neato.

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PaulJun 7, 2010
 

Four Design Links: April 22, 2010

Four Design Links is a review of the design- and ethics-related stories we've been reading online this week.

1. Take Note: New Facebook Privacy Changes

Screenshot of Facebook Connect Policy

Did you see a new Facebook service agreement the last time you checked your status feed? The EFF warns that users should be aware of the latest changes to Facebook Terms of Service:

Today, Facebook removed its users' ability to control who can see their own interests and personal information. Certain parts of users' profiles, "including your current city, hometown, education and work, and likes and interests" will now be transformed into "connections," meaning that they will be shared publicly. If you don't want these parts of your profile to be made public, your only option is to delete them.

Read on for an explanation of why Facebook is doing this and what users can do about it.

2. Dribble

Screenshot from Dribble website

I'm digging on Dribble lately. It's a new website where designers can show tiny (400 x 300px) snippits of what they're working on. Kind of a visual Twitter.

So far, the work seem to have a high level of quality across the board. Despite the small size of the images, there's big inspirado inside.

3. Planes or Volcano?

Plane CO2 vs. Volcano -- InfoGraphic by Information is Beautiful

Another wonderful info-graphic from Information is Beautiful.

4. What's in a Brand Name?

ASUS logo

I get a kick out of design trivia, like this Mental Floss article explaining the brand names of 10 top companies. I thought the story of Asus name was interesting:

Netbook computers are the hottest gadget out there, with around 14 million of the cheap little laptops sold in 2008. One of the big names in netbook production is the Taiwanese computer company, Asus, which gets its name from the winged horse of Greek mythology, Pegasus. But if you took a quick glance at the phone book, “Pegasus” wouldn’t have been too high in the directory of computer companies. So, to increase their visibility in alphabetical lists, they dropped the first three letters of their name. It was an unusual strategy, but apparently it worked.

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NickApr 22, 2010
 

Four Design Links: October 1, 2009

Happy Thursday. Happy October! Happy Anniversary!! Time for Four Design Links. This week features stories about advertising and data. Dig in!

1. Unilever's "Crowdsourcing" Outted as High-Tech Spec

Unilever, which encompasses dozens of popular brands such as Lipton, Bertolli, and Slim-Fast, fired the ad agency representing Peperami (British Slim Jims) and replaced it with what it calls a crowdsourcing solution.

But while most crowdsourcing involves leveraging the collective intelligence of a group for mutual benefit, Unilever marketed the call for ad ideas to professional ad agencies only. Moreover, they are offering a $10,000 bounty to the winning idea. Sound familiar? It's the classic spec work pitch.

Peperami packaging
They should crowdsource a packaging designer, too....

Advertising Age called them on it:

Crowdsourcing at its core is about mass collaboration. Unilever's move, on the other hand, is nothing of the sort. Unilever is looking for no collaboration here. What it is looking for is to get lots of high-quality creative ideas at a significantly lower price. End of story.

UPDATE: There appears to be a whole section on NO!SPEC regarding unethical crowdsourcing practices!

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NickOct 1, 2009
 

Company caught wiretapping your kids’ IM chats

Boing Boing alerted us to a flagrant instance of shady design practice: an Internet child-protection software program that secretly monitors and sells kids' IM conversations to market research companies.

Here's one for the books (and for the DLB taxonomy of unethical designs). According to a recent AP article, parents who install Sentry and FamilySafe brand software to monitor their children's online activities may be unwittingly allowing the company to read their children's instant messages, and sell gathered marketing data from them.

Ultimate laptop privacy

The rest of this post writes itself.

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PaulSep 21, 2009