Blogless: Blog of Design Less Better.

Posts tagged Logos.

The Slant Pays Off (or Does It?)

Here's an interesting visual argument for nostalgia about fast food logos.

Fast food logos, then and now

Via

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PaulOct 21, 2011
 
Tagged with: Blog Less, Logo Design, Logos

Un-branding Tobacco

Proposed legislation in Australia would force cigarette companies to package remove all marketing and branding from cigarettes packs.

I've been following new proposed legislation in Australia that would limit tobacco companies’ design of cigarette packs in an attempt to make tobacco products less appealing. The legislation would force cigarette companies to sell their cigarettes in standardized drab packaging without logos (but with health warnings). The Australian government selected the olive-brown color design based on research that it is one of the least attractive colors; a similar unbranded box has been considered in the UK.

Philip Morris claims that the regulations would violate international trademark and intellectual property law as well as destroying brands that have been costly to build over 40+ years. Ouch.

I'll be interested to see if the plain packaging really does anything to change behaviors (I can see it slowing new uptakes but existing tobacco patrons might not be swayed). Regardless, I do like the idea of the removal of branding as a weapon against marketers who seek to do harm.

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AndreaAug 15, 2011
 
Tagged with: Branding, Legislation, Logos

The Starbucks Logo Redesign

The new Starbucks logo: A bad day for culture at large, but hardly for Starbucks?

Last week, Starbucks unveiled a new logo. This move, as readers of BlogLESS are aware, is done at a brand's own peril. (Further case in point, GapGate.)

Nevertheless, as Olivier Blanchard notes, "Seemingly undaunted by the prospect of having its own logo redesign firebombed across the Twitternets by masses of disappointed customers and fans, Starbucks moved ahead to mark its 40th birthday with such an exercise..."

The result?

Starbucks Logo Redesign

The reaction, predictably, has been almost uniformly negative (and occasionally funny).

Logos Starbucksified
Logos "Starbucksified", courtesy of The Brand Builder Blog

Starbucks had to anticipate a negative reaction. But did they make a mistake?

I myself am not so sure. The logo retains the iconic Starbucks mermaid, and so visual continuity with the previous logo. Starbucks is hardly in a position to lose brand recognition at this point. Certainly, the new logo doesn't "pop" off the cup as much as the old logo does, but logos aren't comic books.

This design seems to me to be more of a political move -- a landgrab -- than a visual one. The point of logos, or at least one of their major functions, is to communicate the idea of a brand to viewers as quickly and simply as possible. If Starbucks can do that with a green circle, that, to my mind, is a huge gain for the coffee giant in the cultural iconographic Zeitgeist.

Of course, we probably ought to mourn the loss of a culture where we didn't associate a green circle with the Starbucks brand, but that's hardly the kind of thing we ought to expect Starbucks to care about. It's worth visualizing the iconographic payoff that Starbucks is playing for with this redesign:

Starbucks Unevolved
The Starbucks logo, unevolved (contrast: Google's logo)
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PaulJan 10, 2011
 

Unevolved Brands

Check out these minimalist logo studies by imjustcreative.

imjustcreative: Famous Logos & Brands Unevolved

It's a testament to strong branding that you can recognize many of these even with the detail removed-- nothing more than color and proportions.

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NickOct 26, 2010
 
Tagged with: Branding, Design, Logos, Minmalism

Spartan Golf Club Logo

One of the best optical illusions I've seen in a modern logo. If you want to start a golf course, it's for sale.

Spartan Golf Club Logo

Via.

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NickMay 4, 2010
 

The year we make contact

All these worlds are yours except Europa. Attempt no landing there. Use them together. Use them in peace.

Here's to another year of worrying about design ethics with you, our friends and readers.

Also, apparently, here's to the International Year of Biodiversity.

2010: The International Year of Biodiversity
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PaulJan 1, 2010
 

Apropos of Friday

This week on BlogLESS ends as it began.

Logo by Mike Sullivan
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PaulOct 16, 2009
 

Four Design Links: October 15, 2009

It's Thursday once again. Take a brisk walk through the leaves with Four Design Links.

1. The Battle Over Good SEO

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is not a legitimate form of marketing. It should not be undertaken by people with brains or souls. If someone charges you for SEO, you have been conned.

That's the start of this blog post from Derek Powazek which is currently causing all manner of controversy in SEO circles. He says some things I believe many web professionals have been thinking and I can't help but agree with his conclusion: If you want people to find you make something great. Tell people about it. Do it again..

Danny Sullivan, an SEO professional, has crafted this defense of SEO, which I also like. He shares some of Powazek's concerns, but is careful to draw the important distinction between bad or spammy SEO and good/legitimate SEO.

Both posts may be worth a read if you are new to SEO or just want to brush up on best (and worst) practices before your next job or client meeting.

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NickOct 15, 2009