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Posts tagged Less is Better.

2010 Global Brand Simplicity Index

Research suggests that less is better.

Siegel+Gale's first annual Global Brand Simplicity Index, [ponders] the following question: Does simplicity matter? And the answer is yes.

Our comprehensive survey of more than 6,000 consumers across seven countries in North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia uncovers the points of complexity and simplicity in people's lives. It also explores the emotional and economic value people place on having a more simplified experience with brands in different industries.

In addition to the qualitative and quantitative information on specific brands and industries around the globe, we used the survey results to develop the first-ever Global Brand Simplicity Index, which generates a rating of each brand on the simplicity/complexity of their interactions and communications relative to their industry peers.

The top 10 brands of the United States Brand Simplicity Index are:

Top 10 Brands for Simplicity, US
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PaulFeb 25, 2011
 

Simple Desktops

Simple Desktops is a collection of desktop wallpapers "designed to make your computer beautiful without distraction".

Some of these simple desktops are quite nice. A couple of choice numbers:

Simple Desktops - Let's Bowl
Let's Bowl!
Simple Desktops - Block
Block

Helpful for those with Desktopitis.

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PaulDec 17, 2010
 

Less is Better: The inevitable decline due to clutter

Seth Godin shares some wise words about clutter in digital media.

Quoting him at length:

Digital media expands. It's not like paper, it can get bigger.

As digital marketers seek to increase profits, they almost always make the same mistake. They continue to add more clutter, messaging and offers, because, hey, it's free.

One more link, one more banner, one more side deal on the Groupon page.

Economics tells us that the right thing to do is run the factory until the last item produced is being sold at marginal cost. In other words, keep adding until it doesn't work any more.

In fact, human behavior tells us that this is a more permanent effect than we realize. Once you overload the user, you train them not to pay attention. More clutter isn't free. In fact, more clutter is a permanent shift, a desensitization to all the information, not just the last bit.

And it's hard to go backward.

More is not always better. In fact, more is almost never better.

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NickDec 2, 2010
 

Less is Better: Clean Air Billboard

This sculpture by Canada's Lead Pencil Studio is all kinds of wonderful.

Powerful use of negative space and the construction makes it look like a three-dimensional tone drawing. Outstanding.

Lead Pencil Studio: Clean Air Billboard
Lead Pencil Studio: Clean Air Billboard
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NickNov 9, 2010
 

USA Simple

Less is Better in this minimalist USA map.

Check out this minimalist USA map by Patrick Mahoney.

USA Simple

Nifty.

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PaulOct 29, 2010
 

Four Design Links:
July 8, 2010

Four Design Links is a review of the design- and ethics-related stories we've been reading online this week. This week: the power of the pause, unhealthy 3D, stupid designers and their clients, and Dell's unethical behavior.

1. The Power of the Pause

One for the Less is Better file, Bobulate asks us to consider the effect of pauses within design:

Walter Benjamin reminds us “architecture is experienced habitually in the state of distraction.” So when a structure that’s always been present on your daily walk suddenly becomes an empty lot, your definition of space and flow changes — there is a pause. And the surrounding environment takes a new form.

Read More.

2. More Evidence that 3D May be Harmful

Revisiting an old story, Slashdot has a few links that suggest 3D television might have adverse affects on people, particularly children.

Sega uncovered serious health risks involved with children consuming 3D and quickly buried the reports, and the project. Unfortunately, the same dangers exist in today's 3D, and the electronics, movie, and gaming industries seem to be ignoring the issue.

Read more

3. Stupid Is As Stupid Does

Another client post, this time from Andy Rutledge. I tend to agree with his take; designers should own up to more responsibility for a good or bad client experience:

There’s an easy test for evaluating design professionalism. The quality of your client experiences is directly proportional to the quality of your professionalism. If you have “stupid clients” it’s because you’re behaving stupidly to begin with, for we attract what we project. If you’ll stop being stupid, your clients’ IQs will increase dramatically.

Read More.

4. Dude, You're Getting a (Broken) Dell

Some bad ethics-related press for Dell. It seems they tried to cover up a hardware problem with some shady behavior and got written up in the NYT:

Documents recently unsealed in a three-year-old lawsuit against Dell show that the company’s employees were actually aware that the computers were likely to break. Still, the employees tried to play down the problem to customers and allowed customers to rely on trouble-prone machines, putting their businesses at risk. Even the firm defending Dell in the lawsuit was affected when Dell balked at fixing 1,000 suspect computers, according to e-mail messages revealed in the dispute.

The broken components had an estimated 97% failure rate, and they're not even going to fix their own lawyers computers? I'll say this: they stayed committed to their own story. To fix the computers would be to admit there was something wrong with them.

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NickJul 8, 2010
 

Nine Ways To Improve An Ad

A classic illustration of Less is Better, nearly 50 years ago, Fred Manley cleverly taught us how bad design slips in from the best of intentions.

Nine Ways To Improve An Ad

I first learned about this article a little over a year ago. If you aren't familiar you owe it to yourself to check it out.

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NickJan 26, 2010
 

Merry Christmas

Have a happy and restful holiday. Thanks for reading BlogLESS.

Pop Tree, by Mic Frazzetto
Melbourne-based architect Mick Frazzetto's 'Pop Tree', an eco-friendly (and spectacularly minimal) Christmas tree is constructed from water-cut ecopanel.
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PaulDec 25, 2009
 
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