Blogless: Blog of Design Less Better.

Posts tagged Comics.

The Story of Gardens

Beautiful pages from "The Story of Gardens", published by kuš!, the only comics magazine in the Baltics (where "comics are practically non-existent").

Images from "The Story of Gardens," a mini-comic by Kuba Woynarowski, published by kuš!:

The Story of Gardens (1/4)
The Story of Gardens (2/4)
The Story of Gardens (3/4)
The Story of Gardens (4/4)

Via

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PaulFeb 24, 2012
 
Tagged with: Color, Comics, Illustration

Traps

A little Friday Zen for you, from Buttersafe.

Traps, by Buttersafe

Via.

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PaulFeb 11, 2011
 
Tagged with: Comics, The Internet, Traps, Zen

Minimalist Super Heroes

Fabian Glez created this minimalist poster featuring 77 super heroes. How many can you name?

Fabian Glez: Minimalist Super Heroes

Update: Minimalist villains!

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NickNov 30, 2010
 
Tagged with: Comics, Minimalism

T-T-Tartamudo

A grandmother goes to extraordinary lengths to seek a cure for her grandchild's speech impediment in Rhode Montijo's delightful T-T-Tartamudo.

I love T-T-Tartamudo by Rhode Montijo.

Tartamudo panel 7 (by Montijo)
Tartamudo panel 8 (by Montijo)
Tartamudo panel 9 (by Montijo)

Read the whole thing here.

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PaulNov 15, 2010
 

Less is Better: Evolution of the Computer

The future is post-digital.

Evolution of the Computer

Via.

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NickJan 5, 2010
 

Four Design Links: August 6, 2009

This week's theme for Four Links is marketing and design humor.

1. The Cheap Ingredients Behind High Tech Products

If you remember the comics magazine Cracked from back in the day (it was similar to Mad Magazine), you may be surprised to see that Cracked.com is completely different. The internet-age incarnation now lampoons strange and unusual facts.

For instance, this recent article (NSFW) reveals that there's not much to common "high tech" products except good marketing:

Screen capture from the Head-On commercial
Screen capture from the Head-On commercial.

HeadOn, as it turns out, is almost completely made from wax, with a small amount of extra crap--small as in parts per trillion--added in. That means it is, effectively, just wax.

2. Business Guys on Business Trips

This comic blog is a recent find for me. If you're in the marketing and design biz, you'll recognize some all-too-familiar frustrations here.

Consistency

3. Things Marketing People Love

If these are some of your favorite sayings or ideas, you just might be a marketer.

Marketing People Love: Augmented Reality
Marketing People Love: Augmented Reality

4. Billboards That Don’t Belong Next To Each Other

Forgive the spammy nature of this post, but these are some pretty good juxtapositions (some NSFW). It's funny to see two strong marketing messages, oblivious of context, crash and burn together.

Obesity vs. McDonald's
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NickAug 6, 2009
 

Good Times with the Google Chrome Comic Book

Why So Serious? Google uses the medium of comics to cut through the complexities of technological communication. Whitepapers were never this fun.

Geeks don't take holidays. Despite the fact that yesterday was Labor Day, the internet buzzed with the news that Google was soon to release its own browser, Chrome. Everyone knew this because Google mailed a press release --in the form of a comic book-- over the weekend.

Some blogs seemed to get a chuckle out of the gesture ("No Joke: Google Introduces the Chrome Browser with a Cartoon"), but I think Google played this one well.

A panel from the Google Chrome comic.
McCloud's visual style is clean and minimal, just how we like it. Moreover, he uses Google employees as protagonists to give it that "pretty bird" appeal.

First off, who better to make the comic than Scott McCloud himself? The man literally wrote the book on comics as visual communication. He takes what could have easily been a rather dull presentation and makes it lively and accessible.

But accessible to whom? Who is the audience for this comic? There are some topics, like process management, that seem geared towards the technical crowd. But then what developer needs to have open source explained to them?

Perhaps Google believes that its users --not just its developers-- should know these details about the software and its politics. Maybe your dad should know how plugin security works. If the new browser is to succeed, Google needs to appeal to more than just surface features (i.e. chrome).

Another panel from the comic.

It shows a lot of respect for the audience to actually try to teach them something rather than try to gloss over it with buzzwords or fancy effects. If Google can educate its audience about what is important in a browser, it will make them critical consumers.

If users are smarter because of their efforts, it raises the bar for everyone who makes a browser-- which, presumably, puts Google in a good position. In that sense, the comic is a form of pedagogical marketing.

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NickSep 2, 2008