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More 2011 Review: Year in Color

To add to our review of year-in-reviews from last week, check out Imprint's Year in Color.

Ok, we’re biased, since the list references our collaboration with FICTILIS for the Colors of Commerce exhibit. But author Jude Stewart highlights some other notables in color from 2011:

#1: On This Day calendar

Reusable for every year, this handy wall calendar consists of heat-sensitive cubes, each marking a noteworthy event from that day in history. Scribble your own notes for the year on the cube’s side, then wash-and-reuse next year – or frame and mount a year in your exceedingly colorful life.

 #9: Imprint’s series on synesthesia

#6: Google Image Search by Color. More useful than I would have ever thought!

Happy 2012!


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AndreaJan 2, 2012
 

2011: Year in Review: In Review

Please enjoy from the future in 2012 this brief summary of reviews of design in 2011.

First off, Design Milk has a nice review of the best of architecture in 2011.

River Side House in Horinouchi by Mizuishi Architect Atelier

Then, enjoy this write-up of the Plumen light bulb by designer Samuel Wilkinson and product design firm Hulger. The Plumen was named the Design Museum‘s Brit Insurance Design of the Year.

Plumen lightbulb by Samuel Wilkinson and Hulger

Also from the Design Museum, the winner of the Brit Insurance Graphics Award for 2011 is BlogLESS favorite Homemade is Best, by Swedish Interactive graphics agency Forsman & Bodenfors.

Homemade is Best, Forsman & Bodenfors for IKEA

And, finally, the interesting A Year in Web Design: How the Experts Saw 2011 from Web Design Tuts is worth a look.

Happy new year to each of you very fine BlogLESS readers.

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PaulDec 30, 2011
 

Modern Christmas Trees

Enjoy some minimal holiday cheer this year, with compliments from your pals at BlogLESS.

A few options for the modern minimalist this Christmas.

Giles Miller Christmas Tree
I Need Nice Things Christmas Tree
Tannenboing Christmas Tree
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PaulDec 23, 2011
 
Tagged with: Christmas, Design, Minimalism

Money: A summary

Visualizing money, from the daily interest on the average American's credit card debt to the total value of the world's proven oil reserves, in four easy steps.

I recently ran across an amazing infographic at xkcd. I have summarized it below.

Money: a summary
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PaulDec 16, 2011
 

Belgica Blue Field

This image by Carl Andre has the amazing property that, if part of it sits below the fold of your browser, then, as you scroll down, it will appear as though you are also zooming in. That, I declare, is neat.

Carl Andre - Belgica Blue Field (1989)

Via Things Organized Neatly and trackbacks pursuant.

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PaulDec 9, 2011
 

Recreated Vintage VW Logo Specification

Want to know how many degrees the central angle of the iconic VW logo measures? Now you can. (Spoiler: 48)

Graham Smith, of I’m Just Creative fame, has recreated the VW logo specification for a downloadable poster. It’s boss.

Recreated Vintage VW Logo Specification
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PaulDec 2, 2011
 

City of Shadows

This holiday weekend, please enjoy these fine photographs from Alexey Titarenko, courtesy of your friends at BlogLESS.

City of Shadows, by Alexey Titarenko (1/3)
City of Shadows, by Alexey Titarenko (2/3)
City of Shadows, by Alexey Titarenko (3/3)

See more here.

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PaulNov 25, 2011
 
Tagged with: Cities, Photographs, Time

Facebook vs. Salary

A recent survey shows that soon-to-be college graduates would trade a higher salary for the opportunity to play on Facebook during the workday.

Here is some relatively startling news: a new study reveals that many college students put potential employers’ social network policies above their financial compensation when deciding what job to take.

The study focused on 2,800 college students and young adults between the ages of 21-29. One in three of those asked claimed that a flexible social media policy was more important to them than financial compensation.

The upshot is that, apparently, the young people would rather have the opportunity to play on Facebook during the workday than to get paid more.

Facebook: Like.

As Alyssa Rosengarden notes, many of those entering the job market have, for their entire (more-or-less-)adult lives, interacted constantly with their friends and families through social networking sites. So, in one sense, it is no surprise that they aren’t prepared to relegate this interaction to the 5-10pm hours.

It is hard to say whether, on balance, we should take this as good news. On the one hand, it’s nice that young people aren’t prioritizing scads of money over regular interpersonal connection. On the other hand, it seems like what the survey has really uncovered is that college students would prefer a job at which they’re not expected to work all day, and while that’s hardly anything new, it’s not the most attractive thing I’ve ever heard, either.

At any rate, it certainly comes to me as news. Perhaps to you as well.

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PaulNov 18, 2011
 
Tagged with: Facebook, Money, Trends
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